Saudis Behead Poor Sri Lankan Maid

AN INNOCENT WOMAN WAS MURDERED TODAY!!!!
AN INNOCENT WOMAN WAS MURDERED TODAY!!!!
AN INNOCENT WOMAN WAS MURDERED TODAY!!!!
AN INNOCENT WOMAN WAS MURDERED TODAY!!!!
TELL ME SAUDIS, DID YOU SERVE THE CAUSE OF GOD
AND ISLAM TODAY??
DID YOU GET TO THE TRUTH AND THE HEART OF THE MATTER??
DOES IT SATISFY YOU PEOPLE THAT YOU GOT YOUR REVENGE
ON SOMEONE THAT ACCIDENTALLY AFFRONTED YOU?!?!

Saudis behead poor Sri Lankan maid

Ranjan Ramanayake, a Sri Lankan MP who campaigns for Sri Lankan workers abroad, described the Saudi government as “dictators” who would never execute Europeans or Americans, only Asians and Africans. There have been many instances of Americans or Europeans being caught committing crimes but after a short jail sentence, they are released after calls from their government to the Saudi authorities. The harsh and cruel punishment is reserved for poor people from third world countries.

saudis-behead-poor-sri-lankan-maid-3567-articles.html

by Crescent-Online.net

January, 2013

As the case dragged on, it became increasingly clear that the heavily biased court would not listen to her side of the story.

Dubai, Crescent-online
January 09, 2013, 21:55 EST

The Saudi regime has beheaded a poor Sri Lankan maid despite appeals for clemency to King Abdullah from her distraught parents as well as the president of Sri Lanka. The Saudi interior ministry announced today that Rizana Nafeek was executed for smothering a child in her care.

She had denied killing the four-month-old infant. Nafeek was only 17 at the time of the alleged killing and had been in the kingdom only a few weeks when she was asked to look after the four-month old baby. Human rights groups say that her execution is a breach of international child rights.

While feeding milk to the infant via a bottle, the child started to choke and later died. The infant’s family living in the town of al-Dwadmi accused her of killing the infant, a charge she vehemently denied. The incident occurred in 2005.

The Sri Lankan government condemned the execution, which it said took place despite numerous clemency pleas. In a statement, the Sri Lankan foreign ministry said that President Rajapakse and the government deplored the execution “despite all efforts at the highest level of the government and the outcry of the people locally and internationally”.

When Nafeek was first accused of killing, no translator was provided to explain to her what she was being charged with or what the consequences of an admission of guilt might be. As a newly arrived domestic servant from Sri Lanka, she did not speak Arabic. No lawyer was provided either but she was coerced into admitting guilt. This was used against her in the kangaroo courts that characterize the legal system in Saudi Arabia. In court she denied the charge and said she was coerced into admitting her guilt by threats from her employer.

Ranjan Ramanayake, a Sri Lankan MP who campaigns for Sri Lankan workers abroad, described the Saudi government as “dictators” who would never execute Europeans or Americans, only Asians and Africans. There have been many instances of Americans or Europeans being caught committing crimes but after a short jail sentence, they are released after calls from their government to the Saudi authorities. The harsh and cruel punishment is reserved for poor people from third world countries.

As the case dragged on and it became increasingly clear that the heavily biased court would not listen to her side of the story, appeals for clemency were made to King Abdullah. Both Nafeek’s parents as well as the Sri Lankan government made appeals on separate occasions. The family hoped that the Saudi monarch would listen to the pleas to spare their daughter’s life who had gone to Saudi Arabia with high hopes of earning a livelihood and to provide for her desperately poor family back home. Their hopes turned into nightmare when within weeks of her arrival in the kingdom, she was accused of murder.

Why she would want to murder an infant was never explained although it was alleged that she had had an argument with the infant’s mother. This is an absurd allegation since domestic servants, especially from poor third world countries, are treated as slaves in Saudi Arabia. How could a 17-year-old dare to argue with her employer, especially when she had been in the kingdom only a few weeks? Her parents sent this poor girl to earn a living, only to be executed by beheading.

Nafeek’s is not the first execution nor will it be the last. Poor workers from Pakistan and India are routinely executed after being accused of minor offenses. The Saudis have a horrible record of mistreating domestic servants and poor workers. Often such executions are turned into a spectacle in the public square where beheadings are carried out.

In Sri Lanka, the execution has rekindled debate about the safety of expatriate workers in the Middle East and about the poverty that drives people like Rizana Nafeek to seek work abroad.

Human rights groups including Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch (HRW) have condemned the Saudi authorities for their handling of the case, as have campaigners in Sri Lanka, who argue that there were also serious translation problems at the time she “confessed” to the crime. They argue that her execution breaches the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child that Saudi Arabia has ratified.

“Saudi Arabia is one of just three countries that executes people for crimes they committed as children,” said senior HRW women’s rights researcher Nisha Varia.

News of the execution came on the same day that the International Labour Organization (ILO) said that laws were needed “urgently” to give greater protection to domestic workers. The ILO report estimates that only about 10% of all domestic workers—about 5.3 million people—are covered by labour laws to the same degree as other workers.

Regrettably such protection is not available to most domestic workers in Saudi Arabia or any of the Gulf sheikhdoms. These workers are not even aware that any such laws exist.

END

2 comments on “Saudis Behead Poor Sri Lankan Maid

  1. Average Joe Bodybuilder on said:

    ————————————————————
    Islamic Human Rights Commission
    ————————————————————

    10 January 2013

    IHRC condemns in the strongest possible manner the execution of Rizana Nafeek, a Sri Lankan maid working in Saudi Arabia. IHRC had campaigned for Rizana over a number of years on several grounds, not least that at the time the alleged offence was committed Rizana was 17 – a minor under Saudi law.

    She came to Saudi when she was 17 years old to work for al-Otaibi household in Dawadmi as a maid. A week after she arrived she was assigned to look after the four month old baby, without any training and in addition to her daily duties. Rizana always claimed the baby had choked while she was feeding it and that she had called for help straight away. Her lawyers had argued that Rizana had been forced to sign a confession in Arabic by police and did not ever have access to reliable translations.

    Head of campaigns, Raza Kazim said, “The execution of Rizana is unacceptable, and yet another indictment of the Saudi legal process. The Saudi government must be held accountable for its breach of human rights. Our thoughts are now with the family of Rizana.”

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  2. Kamal S. on said:

    This is truly misjustice.

    There seems to be two standards among the Khaleejis, one for ‘Aarabs and one for everyone else.